Agriculture / Food

With the advance of the brown marmorated stink bug across the United States, Wisconsin researchers are working to detect when and where their populations will reach nuisance or agricultural pest levels in the state — leading to the first official report of them on on agricultural crops in Wisconsin in early October.
It's not an undertaking that most people must think about in everyday life, but dealing with cow carcasses is serious and oftentimes strenuous business.
With the first green shoots of spring appearing across the state, Wisconsin's insect populations are likewise emerging and preparing for the warmer months ahead.
Scientists may have settled a debate between anglers and fishery managers over the future of the lake trout in the Great Lakes.
In recent decades, ranchers and federal agencies have spent a lot of time figuring out how to expand and improve the use of dogs to guard livestock.
Farms that raise animals — be they poultry, pigs, cows or other livestock — are growing. But whether smaller farms are simply updated with modern technologies or are concentrated animal feeding operations with hundreds or thousands of animals, they enable farmers to reduce costs and increase output.
When temperatures warm in late winter and early spring, it's a good time to take advantage of these conditions to plan tree pruning.
Just when a garden looks good, ravenous Japanese beetles can promptly emerge in the heart of summer to devour the gardener's favorite plants.
It's a not-so-well-kept secret in Wisconsin that hickory nuts taste better when someone else shells them.
Kewaunee County, home to about 20,000 people on the lower half of the Door Peninsula, is hardly the only place in Wisconsin that's seen a rapid growth of concentrated animal feeding operations, but it has become central to a debate over how to regulate manure irrigation.