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As in many other places in the U.S. and around the world, Wisconsin is getting older, enough so that its aging population will have profound economic consequences.
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Peter David knew little about wild rice when he began his job as a biologist for the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission.
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With the onset of the Great Depression in the early 1930s, Rose Mary Drab's older brother Ed enrolled in the Civilian Conservation Corps and was assigned to Camp 657 just north of Antigo in Langlade County.
The landscape of addiction is changing, and so is the way Wisconsinites approach policies addressing substance abuse.
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Few jobs were as miserable and hot as work in a 19th century iron mill – especially in the summer.
The characteristics of student homelessness have changed dramatically over the past decade, including in districts around western Wisconsin.
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The Babcock butterfat test, developed at the University of Wisconsin, provided a simple and inexpensive way to assess the quality of milk.
Financial literacy researchers have no shortage of recommendations on how people should handle their money, how families can learn more about their finances, and how a crisis can encourage new ways of thinking about these issues.
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A bottle from the old Cassel Soda Company in White Fish Bay tells the story of resorts and urbanization in early 20th century Wisconsin.
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Trained as a classical musician in Mexico, Raphael Baez was recruited to come to the United States by the C.D. Hess Opera Company in the 1880s.