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Wisconsin's name came from the Algonquian language family — spoken by tribes in Wisconsin like the Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi and Mohican. But it certainly wasn't pronounced as it is today.
When large numbers of emigrants from Norway started making their way to the United States in the mid-19th century, Wisconsin was one of the first places they settled.
Measles is back, and at a level not seen for a quarter-century, meaning a generation of healthcare workers have little experience with the disease.
Tobacco used to be a major cash crop in Wisconsin, but today very few farms remain.
The United States Department of Agriculture census documents a large and diverse farming economy in Wisconsin, but also one in flux.
The drought-parched spring of 1977 was a particularly dangerous season of wildfire, with a trio of big burns in west-central Wisconsin and the Five Mile Tower Fire in the state's northwest corner.
Whether a meadow of flowering bulbs or a mix of grasses and herbaceous perennials, more varied green spaces provide aesthetic value and habitat for diverse animal communities.
The annual Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey covers about 100 roadside routes across the state, along which volunteers stop at 10 listening stations to document breeding calls from the amphibians.
The same aspects of rural life that are attractive to many Wisconsinites — solitude, space, smaller communities — can often make getting the health care they need a challenge that ranges from mere inconvenience to life-threatening.
Humankind never fails to succeed in producing trash. And this propensity toward pollution is extending beyond Earth's confines.