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Bonnie began volunteering as a literacy tutor after seeing a notice in the newspaper. She was soon paired up with Ruth, who is working toward her GED.
Joe Grande
Public policies addressing lead in drinking water have serious holes, as reports from Wisconsin Public Radio and the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism revealed this week. But Wisconsin is also the home of one of the more ambitious lead-mitigation projects in U.S. history.
Reports of lead contamination in Flint, Michigan's water supply has people across the country questioning the safety of their own water.
Gooseneck pipes
About 39 percent of Wisconsin's households get their drinking water from private wells while most of the rest of the state's 5.7 million people rely on public utilities for this basic necessity. But utility customers across Wisconsin get their water on very different terms.
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In 1952, the DNR made an intact wetland in Ozaukee County known as the Cedarburg Bog a Wisconsin State Natural Area, only the second piece of land to receive that designation at the time.
faucet
Although nearly 900,000 Wisconsin households rely on private wells for drinking water, its quality is not a matter of certainty.
Despite all the heavy rain in the first half of December, with flood warnings across parts of the state, Wisconsinites should be thankful they did not experience a downpour on the order of 5 inches in just 24 hours. Such extreme rainfall can cause damaging flooding, severe soil erosion and crop loss.
Sharon Long
Waterborne pathogens can cycle between the environment and their human and animal hosts, causing illness in people and spreading disease between households. To determine how fecal matter contaminates groundwater, scientists use indicators that specify the source, identifying it as human or animal waste.
Sea surface temperatures
One major factor behind the warm Wisconsin autumn is the emergence of an El Niño that is shaping up to be the biggest in nearly two decades.
Kenneth Bradbury
Leaky sewer pipes might be the source of viruses found in drinking water that Wisconsin municipalities draw from bedrock aquifers 800 feet below ground, research hydrogeologist Kenneth Bradbury said in an Aug. 1, 2012, talk at the Wednesday Nite @ the Lab science series on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.