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Multiple Wisconsin counties are lifting their safer-at-home and emergency orders ahead of schedule.
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Contact tracing people exposed to COVID-19 is becoming increasingly important as Wisconsin starts to reopen, but what does the process actually look like? WisContext associate editor Will Cushman discusses how this public health effort is expanding around the state.
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Amid efforts to reduce backlogs of evidence submitted to the Wisconsin State Crime Lab for processing, turnaround times in some categories continue to grow, particularly when it comes to DNA evidence.
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For the first time in two months, the state plans to begin accepting a limited number of new prisoners to correctional facilities starting June 1.
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There are 13,413 positive cases of COVID-19 in Wisconsin as of May 20, according to the state Department of Health Services. That's an increase of 528 cases from the day before.
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Wisconsin residents struggling to pay their rent could be eligible to receive up to $3,000 under a rental assistance program announced by Gov. Tony Evers.
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There have been a whirlwind of changes for Wisconsin after the state Supreme Court struck down the statewide "Safer at Home" order. Wisconsin Public Radio Capitol bureau reporter Laurel White explains how a local patchwork of stay-at-home rules took shape.
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On May 13 the state Supreme Court overturned Wisconsin's stay-at-home order. Some counties and municipalities across the state immediately began issuing their own orders or announcing the state's "Safer at Home" order would still apply in areas under their jurisdiction.
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The COVID-19 pandemic is adding hurdles for Wisconsin residents with disabilities to find caregivers, and both are weighing tough questions about how to keep each other safe during close interactions — if that's even possible at a time when protective equipment runs scarce.
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A manufacturer of firefighting foam says the majority of more than 250 drinking water wells it's tested in Marinette County turned up no trace of toxic chemicals known as PFAS. But state regulators say it's too early to tell the scope of PFAS contamination within drinking water in the area.