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Wisconsin is regularly at the center of Great Lakes water politics, but it's not the only place where controversies arise.
Since the 2013-2014 school year, Wisconsin school districts have seen a 1.5 percent decline in pre-K-12 enrollment, with some districts seeing gains and others even bigger losses.
The victory by Rebecca Dallet over Michael Screnock in the Wisconsin Supreme Court election on April 3, 2018 capped off a particularly partisan campaign for what is officially a non-partisan seat.
Many people are confused about the status of the Affordable Care Act: Did it get repealed? Are people still required to have health insurance? What about Medicaid and BadgerCare? Are recipients required to work and to submit to drug testing? Who do the various policy changes affect?
The last week of March brought an exhausting whirlwind to Wisconsin's courts and statehouse as Gov. Scott Walker and his Republican allies fought against calling special elections in two vacant state legislative districts and sought to quickly rewrite a portion of state's elections law.
Over the course of three months, a seemingly mundane state personnel matter snowballed into a string of inaction and action across all three branches of government that was unprecedented in Wisconsin's political landscape.
Mexican immigrants and their descendants born in the United States comprise a growing and increasingly visible group of communities around Wisconsin.
Wisconsin's growing mosaic of struggles over voting rights grew even more complex in March 2018, when Milwaukee officials raised questions about a program that deactivated around 44,000 voter registrations in the city.
Wisconsin has yet to wrap up one big conversation about how it uses Great Lakes water, and is already embarking upon another.
A month-and-a-half before the first dandelion heads crest above recently thawed soil, honey bees that survive the winter are already busy preparing to collect spring's first grains of pollen.