Context
Context. Explaining the issues

Context

Hundreds of children in Wisconsin's child welfare and juvenile justice systems who have complex behavioral health needs are being sent for care to facilities outside of the state — as far away as New Hampshire and New Mexico.
Children who suffer abuse or neglect or who live in dysfunctional homes often carry the burdens of these experiences into adulthood. Behavioral health professionals call these ordeals "adverse childhood experiences," or ACEs.
A sweeping shift over the past few decades in the practice of behavioral health has come to be known as trauma-informed care, an approach adopted by dozens of counties and tribes in Wisconsin.
Wisconsin launched an industrial hemp pilot program in 2018 and now has more than 2,100 applications for licenses in 2019.
Wisconsin's name came from the Algonquian language family — spoken by tribes in Wisconsin like the Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi and Mohican. But it certainly wasn't pronounced as it is today.
When large numbers of emigrants from Norway started making their way to the United States in the mid-19th century, Wisconsin was one of the first places they settled.
Measles is back, and at a level not seen for a quarter-century, meaning a generation of healthcare workers have little experience with the disease.
Tobacco used to be a major cash crop in Wisconsin, but today very few farms remain.
The United States Department of Agriculture census documents a large and diverse farming economy in Wisconsin, but also one in flux.
The drought-parched spring of 1977 was a particularly dangerous season of wildfire, with a trio of big burns in west-central Wisconsin and the Five Mile Tower Fire in the state's northwest corner.