Health

Data about substance abuse is plentiful. The difficult part is pulling together all that information, analyzing it, and identifying the patterns.
When longtime city of Milwaukee Health Commissioner Bevan Baker resigned on Jan. 12, it brought renewed attention to the city's broader struggle to address the problem of lead poisoning.
Wisconsin's infant mortality rate has held steady over the past few years, in line with and sometimes below the national average. In fact, the rate of infants dying in the state between 2013-15 is slightly lower than it was a decade earlier.
In 1918, the Spanish flu attacked young, otherwise healthy adults, killed quickly and often, and leapt from Europe to Wisconsin with unimaginable speed. Its cause was unknown; its mode of transmission was unknown; how to stop it was unknown.
Madison might be at the center of Wisconsin's loudest discussion about homelessness right now, but the problem extends far beyond the state's capital city. In fact, the majority of the state’s homeless people documented in a 2015 federal report were outside the Madison and Milwaukee areas.
The Lyme disease incidence rate in Wisconsin has been well above the national average since at least 2005, and is rivaled by only a handful of other states. But these numbers don't represent a definitive count.
As opioids increasingly dominate the national conversation about substance abuse, addiction and overdose deaths, public health professionals are asking some difficult questions.
The opioid crisis is hitting rural and suburban areas hard, but that doesn't mean people in Wisconsin's largest city have been spared.
Operating an LCD screen manufacturing plant in Wisconsin would raise a number of environmental question marks.
Avian flu impacts in the U.S.
The 2015 avian influenza epidemic was the largest in U.S. history, affecting more than 48 million domestic poultry birds in 15 states between December 2014 and June 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.