History

Journalist Dan Egan and political economist Jenny Kehl take Steve Paulson through the finer points of the politics of water in the Great Lakes.
Two centuries of urbanization and industrialization around the Great Lakes have often hinged on tension among those who've desired their extraordinary supplies of fresh water.
A 50-mile march from Madison to Janesville intentionally sought to emulate the civil rights movement of the 1950s and '60s, and the 54-mile marches in Alabama from Selma to Montgomery.
In a highly connected age of smartphone shopping and new automated grocery delivery services, a trip to a local farmers' market can seem like an anachronistic journey to the past.
Mexican immigrants and their descendants born in the United States comprise a growing and increasingly visible group of communities around Wisconsin.
If a voter in Wisconsin sues the state to try and compel the governor to call a special election, they might have a hard time finding precedent for that action.
Wisconsin has eight seats out of 435 total in the U.S. House of Representatives, at least until population fluctuations within the state and around the nation entitle it to a different level of representation.
In 1918, the Spanish flu attacked young, otherwise healthy adults, killed quickly and often, and leapt from Europe to Wisconsin with unimaginable speed. Its cause was unknown; its mode of transmission was unknown; how to stop it was unknown.
Rowdy leisure activities gave late 19th century workers in the Fox Valley a social sphere in which to share ideas about labor organizing and economic justice.
How vacant state legislative seats get filled seems to have long been a hairy question — that is, when people think much about it at all.