History

The state of Wisconsin's official "Blue Book" lived up to its moniker for a very long time.
For many Upper Midwesterners in the 21st century, not much could seem more familiar than the marks of Scandinavian influence on regional culture. But there was a time in North American history when Norwegians, Swedes and Danes were considered peculiar outsiders.
Wisconsin has been a battleground state in presidential elections for decades, but over time, the political landscape has shifted. Voting patterns are increasingly becoming defined by geography, with population density serving as a marker of partisan preference.
The World's Columbian Exposition in 1893 made renowned contributions to American amusement park attractions, cheap beer branding and serial killer lore, but it likewise provided a profound influence on the Wisconsin State Capitol.
An investigation of 105 special elections in Wisconsin since 1971, as well as 45 legislative vacancies not filled through special elections over the same time period, indicates that it's pretty normal for governors to call them swiftly and without much fuss. But Gov. Scott Walker is challenging that norm with a recent decision.
The ways in which contemporary Wisconsinites interpret and value the state's ancient effigy mounds continue to evolve.
As many smaller Wisconsin communities face declining population and changing economic realities, people across the state are seeking opportunities for renewal.
Wisconsin's roots as a state are found in a patchwork of scrappy independent settlements, interspersed with the occasional fraudulent land scheme.
While much of the nation's eyes were turned toward the South, struggle for equal opportunities and accompanying social unrest also reached a boiling point in northern states, particularly in cities like Chicago, Detroit and Milwaukee.
Hmong refugees fleeing war in Vietnam and Laos began arriving in the United States in 1976 — many of them after fighting alongside Americans in the Vietnam War, or losing loved ones in that conflict Over the ensuing four decades, Wisconsin has become home to the nation's third-largest Hmong population following California and Minnesota.