People / Policy

When longtime city of Milwaukee Health Commissioner Bevan Baker resigned on Jan. 12, it brought renewed attention to the city's broader struggle to address the problem of lead poisoning.
While place of birth is straightforward for most people, for a few the waters are uncertain.
To understand why moving a couple of DMV locations in Madison would cause outcry, it helps to understand some of the finer points of getting around in Wisconsin's capital and second-most populous city.
While much of the nation's eyes were turned toward the South, struggle for equal opportunities and accompanying social unrest also reached a boiling point in northern states, particularly in cities like Chicago, Detroit and Milwaukee.
As the United States increasingly closed its doors to refugees fleeing conflict and persecution around the world, resettlement numbers across the nation and in Wisconsin dropped by about two-thirds.
The number of babies born in a given year can have deep social and economic implications, as both younger and older adults may know from their experiences in crowded schools, competitive job markets, and, for the latter, retirement destinations.
Every year, my large, extended family gathers for the entire week of Thanksgiving, which also coincides with deer hunting season in Wisconsin. While we agree to get along, we also rarely talk about controversial topics.
The arguments driving a potentially landmark court case over partisan gerrymandering in Wisconsin may already be outdated.
In the age of big data, it is possible to influence election results by drawing district boundaries without producing the bizarre-looking legislative districts which gave "gerrymandering" its name.
Gov. Scott Walker and state economic development officials want to spend about $7 million on a marketing campaign to entice young, college-educated workers to move to Wisconsin.