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The speed at which the novel coronavirus has raced around the world, and the severity of the disease it causes, has sparked interest in humanity's last experience with a contagion of such scale.
Tracking data related to the pandemic can help clarify this torrent of information. Here are several visualizations that depict the impacts of COVID-19 across Wisconsin.
At the time, it seemed almost absurd. During an emergency meeting of the Sister Bay Village Board of Trustees on March 16, 2020, trustee Rob Zoschke leaned back in his chair and asked bluntly: "Should we be telling resorts to close down and not accept reservations and cancel existing ones?"
There are simply not enough resources available to test most people who are sick in Wisconsin and across the United States.The dilemma is spurring local and regional health systems to increasingly take testing matters into their own hands, a move state officials not only endorse but are actively pursuing.
Over the course of a single historic week, daily life in Wisconsin and across much of the United States ground to a halt as a dangerous new virus arrived in communities across the nation. A flurry of shutdowns raced to keep up with the spread of COVID-19 and the growing realization of its looming human impact.
As Wisconsin voters start going to the polls in the 2020 election cycle, most counties in the state maintain websites that do not employ at least one of two basic practices that would help bolster their digital security and public confidence in their online platforms.
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Water levels on Wisconsin's rivers and lakes are starting to rise due to snow melt. But officials from the state Department of Natural Resources warn groundwater levels in the state are already at or near record highs.
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Researchers with UW-Madison and others analyzed groundwater data collected by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources from 2000 to 2018. They found radium levels were trending upward in wells drawing from a regional aquifer underlying the southern two-thirds of the state.
While the census is still weeks away, here's what you need to know about it — and what it means for Wisconsin and the nation.
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Two-thirds of Wisconsin's rural counties lost population between 2010 and 2018, according to a report from Forward Analytics. It's a trend that's likely to get worse in the next decade.