History

Wisconsin's population structure is dominated by the magnitude of the baby-boom generation, and their presence is strongest in rural areas.
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The Wisconsin Legislature is the most polarized by party in recent decades. UW-Green Bay political scientist Aaron Weinschenk discusses how legislators' roll call votes help shape the metric of polarization.
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Wisconsin Life
The Anishinaabe Solidarity Relay began in 1989. It was a response to racism and hatred directed towards Ojibwe people at boat landings and elsewhere after hunting and fishing treaty rights were affirmed by U.S. Supreme Court.
Its gaze stretches far beyond Earth's confines, and it's taken part in astronomy research around the planet, but when the sun sets, the Burnham telescope calls Wisconsin home.
The ability to issue partial vetoes of appropriations bills has allowed Wisconsin governors since 1930 to wield a quasi-legislative power that can substantially — and sometimes controversially — alter the text and implications of appropriations bills with little if any legislative input.
The book We've Been Here All Along: Wisconsin's Early Gay History chronicles the history of LGBTQ Wisconsinites prior to the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York. Author R. Richard Wagner discusses how many people lived their lives amid pervasive homophobia.
For nearly two decades after World War II, leaders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison systematically outed gay students to their families, extended harsh punishments for suspected homosexual activity and participated in harmful attempts at psychiatric treatment.
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Here's a classic joke: A miner, a sailor and a badger walk into a busy bar. Actually, it's not a bar … it's the Wisconsin state flag.
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In 1919, Wisconsin was the first state in the nation to ratify the constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. A celebration at the state Capitol 100 years later recalled that history and its legacy.
In the 1960s and 1970s, several dozen rural taverns were located within a 7-mile radius from the center of the city of Marshfield. But by the end of the 20th century, more than three-fourths had closed their doors.