History

In 1918, the Spanish flu attacked young, otherwise healthy adults, killed quickly and often, and leapt from Europe to Wisconsin with unimaginable speed. Its cause was unknown; its mode of transmission was unknown; how to stop it was unknown.
Rowdy leisure activities gave late 19th century workers in the Fox Valley a social sphere in which to share ideas about labor organizing and economic justice.
How vacant state legislative seats get filled seems to have long been a hairy question — that is, when people think much about it at all.
When debating Gov. Scott Walker's decision to not call special elections to fill two vacancies in the Wisconsin Legislature, state political figures and commentators have argued over the move's implications elections law, public spending and democracy itself. But what about precedent?
An investigation of 105 special elections in Wisconsin since 1971, as well as 45 legislative vacancies not filled through special elections over the same time period, indicates that it's pretty normal for governors to call them swiftly and without much fuss. But Gov. Scott Walker is challenging that norm with a recent decision.
While place of birth is straightforward for most people, for a few the waters are uncertain.
While much of the nation's eyes were turned toward the South, struggle for equal opportunities and accompanying social unrest also reached a boiling point in northern states, particularly in cities like Chicago, Detroit and Milwaukee.
The number of babies born in a given year can have deep social and economic implications, as both younger and older adults may know from their experiences in crowded schools, competitive job markets, and, for the latter, retirement destinations.
The polarized nature of politics in Wisconsin is not a new development, and intense debate has been a common aspect of life in the state capitol building going back to its opening in 1917.
A building intended to serve as a symbol of freedom and democracy marks its centennial in 2017. But before the Wisconsin State Capitol building rose in the center of Madison, two earlier state houses stood in its place.