Fieldwork
Fieldwork. From the experts

Fieldwork

The latest non-native pest to arrive in Wisconsin is the tiny purple carrot-seed moth, and its impacts are not yet fully known.
While efforts after August 2018 storms focused on cleaning up and limiting flooding, Madison will need to address its vulnerability to extreme rainfall if it wants to prepare for the future.
Observant visitors to parks and gardens around Wisconsin over the summer might have noticed a surprising creature hovering among the flowers — the hummingbird-like sphinx moth.
People tend to see a river as an immutable part of the landscape. If we look a little deeper, however, we see evidence of rivers responding to changes in land and water uses, even changes in climate.
Chinch bugs aren't much to write home about, but played a key role in Wisconsin history.
In Wisconsin, a desire for quality education and the costs of making such an investment has led to a funding system that can vary significantly by where a school is located.
In the 21st century, nearly a century after its founding in the 1930s, the institution balances Wisconsin's tradition of ecological research with public outreach, citizen-science projects and hosting visitors.
Beets have come a long way to fields and vegetable gardens from their roots as a leafy green growing wild in the sandy soil of the Mediterranean.
Many of farmers' markets fail within their first four years in business. While their number has swelled, inexperienced management, high manager turnover, small size and low resources can make a market more susceptible to collapse.
As many Wisconsinites know, not all farmers' markets are the same, but they are found in all types of communities – cities, small towns, suburbs and rural areas.