Health

As the dairy industry struggles with low prices in the face of a long-mounting milk glut, more farmers are finding that their woes are escalating.
Many people are confused about the status of the Affordable Care Act: Did it get repealed? Are people still required to have health insurance? What about Medicaid and BadgerCare? Are recipients required to work and to submit to drug testing? Who do the various policy changes affect?
Every 65 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's disease, and its prevalence is growing as the nation ages.
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center are working to develop an experimental vaccine for the deadly Ebola virus, and announced in February 2018 that they'll begin phase 1 human clinical trials in Japan by the end of the year.
In the aftermath of tragedy, people often go searching for answers: How could this happen? Why did someone do this? Could this have been avoided?
In 1918, the Spanish flu attacked young, otherwise healthy adults, killed quickly and often, and leapt from Europe to Wisconsin with unimaginable speed. Its cause was unknown; its mode of transmission was unknown; how to stop it was unknown.
Healthcare providers across the United States are longing to get back to a steady drip.
As Wisconsinites push through a hard flu season, public-health officials are following a distinct mix of influenza strains and worrying about the effectiveness of this year's vaccines, but they're also thinking a lot about an intricate disease-tracking network that's been built up over time.
A spike in flu cases comes as healthcare providers continue to deal with a shortage of one of their most common and crucial tools: pre-filled IV bags.
Dr. Bennet Omalu likens the American obsession with football to a religion. In that regard, he might be considered a heretic: Omalu has equated allowing children to play football to child abuse and warns that the NFL is doomed unless it starts reducing harmful blows to the head.