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As restaurants across the state reopen, some people are still concerned about the safety of indoor dining. Now, several cities are making it easier for restaurants to expand outdoor seating.
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UW System President Ray Cross has announced 40 layoffs in the central office's UW-Shared Services division. This accounts for about 19 percent of the total workforce.
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The Hodag Country Festival in Rhinelander will not happen in July, despite having received permission from an Oneida County Board committee to move forward.
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Cell phone mobility data shows Wisconsin residents started traveling more during the first week of May. And that movement continued to increase after the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down the state's "Safer at Home" order on May 13.
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Retailers are grappling with two new realities as they re-open their storefronts: the expense of operating a business safely during the pandemic, and uncertainty about whether they’ll get as many customers as they did before.
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Wisconsin and the United States are trending down in birth rates, marking a four-year decline according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. Nationwide, the birth rate hasn't been this low since 1985.
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Of the 2.4 million weekly claims submitted to the state between March 15 and May 23, about 728,000 had yet to be paid as of the latter date, according to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.
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A country music festival with expected attendance of more than 16,000 people per day is among the first major gatherings in Wisconsin approved to move forward amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
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The state Supreme Court won't take up a second lawsuit challenging Wisconsin's "Safer at Home" order, a step that could preserve the power of local governments to issue their own stay-at-home restrictions.
Many people have heard of Typhoid Mary, but far fewer know the name Mary Mallon.