Data
Data. Maps and charts

Data

Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
More people are being locked up in Wisconsin, and the increase in inmates in county jails and state prisons is costing taxpayers and straining capacity of corrections facilities in some places.
Following two years of steep drops, the number of international refugees who resettled in Wisconsin leveled off in 2019.
For the second time in as many years, Wisconsin's gears of democracy have slipped and slowed on the questions of how and when a special election would be set by the governor's office.
Shared via
WPR
Nearly 60 years after gray wolves were considered extinct in Wisconsin, the population has rebounded dramatically. But the conservation success story has turned into a nuisance for hunters, farmers and others whose animals are increasingly encountering wolves.
Hardly more than a century ago, deer were not to be found across broad swaths of southern and eastern parts of Wisconsin, with their dwindling ranks limited to its northern stretches after decades of mass hunts for hide and meat markets in the latter half of the 1800s.
The threat of chronic wasting disease to Wisconsin's booming whitetail deer herd is motivating efforts to track and research its spread, but this deadly ailment also imperils efforts to reintroduce wild elk to the state.
Shared via
PBS Wisconsin
The 2019 gun deer season marks the 18th since the discovery of chronic wasting disease in Wisconsin's herd. Four hunters explain why they do and do not get their harvest tested for CWD. Meanwhile, researchers are using a depopulated deer farm to investigate how the disease is spread.
While a variety of people have found success treating their medical ailments with cannabis, the drug remains illegal in Wisconsin.
How can all of the state's tiny, elusive nocturnal flyers be counted? That's not possible. But the downward spiral of several bat species in Wisconsin can be tracked through the work of passionate conservation professionals, specialized technology and, crucially, legions of enthusiastic volunteers.
When Madison barber and business owner Brian Britt, 42, stepped up to a folding table in the entryway of the Urban League of Greater Madison, he had a single goal in his mind: Wipe from his record the decades-old criminal convictions he says are holding him back.