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There are simply not enough resources available to test most people who are sick in Wisconsin and across the United States.The dilemma is spurring local and regional health systems to increasingly take testing matters into their own hands, a move state officials not only endorse but are actively pursuing.
When a new and dangerous respiratory disease started racing around the globe in early 2020, it had been just over a century since humankind endured the 1918 influenza pandemic.
Over the course of a single historic week, daily life in Wisconsin and across much of the United States ground to a halt as a dangerous new virus arrived in communities across the nation. A flurry of shutdowns raced to keep up with the spread of COVID-19 and the growing realization of its looming human impact.
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Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett and the city’s health department is meeting with local hospital officials to prepare for a COVID-19 outbreak.
No matter how methods have changed over the ages, a lot of time and energy go into transforming the springtime sap flows of maple trees into sweet, sugary syrup.
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Researchers with UW-Madison and others analyzed groundwater data collected by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources from 2000 to 2018. They found radium levels were trending upward in wells drawing from a regional aquifer underlying the southern two-thirds of the state.
A serious new respiratory illness is gaining steam around the world, and epidemiologists, virologists and many other scientists are sprinting to learn as much about it as quickly as possible.
Beloit stands out in Wisconsin. It's a small city — home to fewer than 40,000 people — with a relatively large African American community.
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The novel coronavirus has reached Wisconsin, making it the 12th confirmed case in the U.S. Wisconsin state epidemiologist Ryan Westergaard discusses this case, pending investigations and how the virus could potentially spread in the region.
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The Wisconsin Elections Commission is issuing and managing "A" and "B" ballots for the spring 2020 primary and general elections. Superior city clerk Terri Kalan discusses the differences between the absentee ballots being sent to voters in the 7th Congressional District special election.