Environment

Wisconsin's decision to let Foxconn draw water from Lake Michigan may set a precedent for water use that resonates across the Great Lakes region and beyond.
Wisconsin's wild bees are a small but mighty part of the ecosystem for native plants and agriculture alike. And they're in trouble.
Whether they are baked into a pie, folded into pancakes or eaten fresh, blueberries are a perennial favorite that tempt many gardeners with visions of growing their own bountiful supply of sweet indigo globules.
The Upper Midwest and the northeastern regions of the United States are increasingly a carpet of Lyme disease cases each summer and autumn. But the southeastern part of the country — a vast expanse of hot and humid territory and certainly hospitable to the ticks that carry Lyme-causing bacteria — gets off relatively easy.
Over the course of just a few decades at the end of the 19th century, millions upon millions of birds were killed in a spree of hunting for food and feathers.
After years of Wisconsin testing fewer deer for chronic wasting disease but finding more cases of infections, a new study offered some additional clues about how CWD might spread through the environment.
It's not an undertaking that most people must think about in everyday life, but dealing with cow carcasses is serious and oftentimes strenuous business.
It is a common misperception that forests stay the same. Woodlands change slowly over many years, and the shifts may be imperceptible to the casual observer.
Since the earliest days of humankind, people have excelled at exploring and expanding their presence to nearly every spot on the map. With all of this wanderlust, humans have been equally adept at taking other species with them on their travels — often with unintended consequences.
Journalist Dan Egan and political economist Jenny Kehl take Steve Paulson through the finer points of the politics of water in the Great Lakes.