Policy

For nearly two decades after World War II, leaders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison systematically outed gay students to their families, extended harsh punishments for suspected homosexual activity and participated in harmful attempts at psychiatric treatment.
Wisconsin's agricultural bounty is possible thanks in part to the state's voluminous supply of freshwater. At the same time, the use of this resource to grow crops and nourish livestock poses risks to the quality of these waters.
The city of Madison's water quality manager, Joe Grande, voluntarily tested for PFAS chemicals in public water wells that aren't regulated. Grande discusses what is known and remains unknown about these pollutants.
Wisconsin courts have suffered from a dearth of attorneys to hire when public defenders are unavailable. State Supreme Court Chief Justice Pat Roggensack says a budget measure increasing pay for these attorneys is "absolutely critical."
The quality of drinking water resources is increasingly an area of focus among Wisconsin's political leaders. Their efforts, in turn, are generating significant interest around the state.
How are buzzed, drunk and high drivers held accountable for their actions in Wisconsin?
Dane County has been selected as one of 13 sites across the country to test a new model: a public-defender-style system aimed at providing a lawyer to every detained, indigent immigrant.
Among immigrants living in Wisconsin whose cases began between 2010 and 2015, those who had lawyers were more than six times as likely to be allowed to stay in the country as those who didn't have representation.
Expanding Medicaid funding in Wisconsin has been politically divisive in the state. But what could an expansion mean for healthcare providers?
The ongoing trade dispute between the U.S. and China continues to raise concerns among Wisconsin farmers. Wisconsin Farmers Union president Darin Von Ruden discusses how farmers navigate low commodity prices on top of this trade uncertainty.