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Although Wisconsin technically has non-partisan elections, partisanship has been on full display in recent state Supreme Court races.
In 1918, the Spanish flu attacked young, otherwise healthy adults, killed quickly and often, and leapt from Europe to Wisconsin with unimaginable speed. Its cause was unknown; its mode of transmission was unknown; how to stop it was unknown.
Wetlands make up a part of the landscape in every Wisconsin county.
Rowdy leisure activities gave late 19th century workers in the Fox Valley a social sphere in which to share ideas about labor organizing and economic justice.
How vacant state legislative seats get filled seems to have long been a hairy question — that is, when people think much about it at all.
Healthcare providers across the United States are longing to get back to a steady drip.
Scientists may have settled a debate between anglers and fishery managers over the future of the lake trout in the Great Lakes.
When debating Gov. Scott Walker's decision to not call special elections to fill two vacancies in the Wisconsin Legislature, state political figures and commentators have argued over the move's implications elections law, public spending and democracy itself. But what about precedent?
An investigation of 105 special elections in Wisconsin since 1971, as well as 45 legislative vacancies not filled through special elections over the same time period, indicates that it's pretty normal for governors to call them swiftly and without much fuss. But Gov. Scott Walker is challenging that norm with a recent decision.
When it comes to elections in Wisconsin, just about everything seems to be growing more complicated.