Context
Context. Explaining the issues

Context

Many people have heard of Typhoid Mary, but far fewer know the name Mary Mallon.
Short of a cure or effective treatment for COVID-19, something that could take years to develop, state and local health officials in Wisconsin are planning for a future where contact tracing plays a central role in combating the disease.
Everyone is vulnerable to conspiracism, said Ajay Sethi, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. With COVID-19, that's especially true.
A highly contagious disease put the population in a panic. The government's response became politicized. Less affluent neighborhoods bore the brunt of the outbreak. The best medical science of the day was doubted. An aggressive protest against public health enforcement broke out.
Is Wisconsin finding more cases of COVID-19 because more people are becoming infected with the virus that causes it, or because more people are being tested for it? Answers to this question are anything but simple.
"Spanish flu" ultimately killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide and 675,000 across the U.S., including 8,459 people in Wisconsin. History is resonating more than a century later as the state fights a new viral villain that has upended life across the world.
More than a month after Wisconsin directed residents to stay home as much as possible to slow the spread of COVID-19, adherence to the state's "safer at home" order is beginning to erode.
Charting the animal origins of human diseases like COVID-19 can be difficult and often leads to unexpected discoveries.
Days after Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers announced the state's Safer-at-Home order, a subtly misleading framework for Wisconsin's COVID-19 projections appeared on Twitter.
Wisconsinites are adapting to life under the cloud of COVID-19, and for a growing group that means getting into the habit of covering up with a face mask when they venture from their homes.