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Series: Health Insurance And The ACA

The health system in the U.S. is built upon a complex and interlocking series of relationships between medical providers, insurers, the federal and state governments, employers and the people who require preventive care and treatment throughout their lives. The enactment of the Affordable Care Act, one goal of which was securing coverage for more Americans, has profoundly transformed this system since its implementation, including in Wisconsin. At the same time, the political contentiousness of the law has added complexity and uncertainty to the health care decisions Americans make, and the future of the health care system continues to be an open question.
 
The Trump administration proposed rules designed to stabilize the insurance market for those getting policies under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.
As a new president took office after campaigning hard against the Affordable Care Act, a University of Wisconsin physician is urging caution on making immediate changes to the health care system.
Consumers, insurance companies and health care providers are experiencing déjà vu. Politicians are once again attempting to make big changes to the nation's health care system.
A report by George Washington University and the Commonwealth Fund estimates thousands of jobs would be lost in Wisconsin if two key elements of the Affordable Care Act are repealed.
Repeal and... what exactly then? And is repeal even certain?
As Republicans pursue efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the federal healthcare exchanges says there is "extraordinary demand" to enroll in ACA plans. In Wisconsin, enrollment is up 14 percent over this time last year.
A statewide coalition's annual report on health insurance costs shows the rate of health care inflation was seven times higher in Wisconsin before the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.
Despite rising premiums and an uncertain future for the Affordable Care Act, more people are signing up for insurance on HealthCare.gov.
The share of Americans covered by health insurance reached a never-before-seen high in 2015, both nationally and in Wisconsin, which retained its ongoing position as one of the best-covered states in the nation.
The number of Americans without health insurance would more than double if Congress repealed the Affordable Care Act. That's according to a study by the nonpartisan Urban Institute looking at the consequences of repealing the health care law with no immediate replacement.