Series: The Novel Coronavirus, COVID-19 And Wisconsin: May 2020


 
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There have been a whirlwind of changes for Wisconsin after the state Supreme Court struck down the statewide "Safer at Home" order. Wisconsin Public Radio Capitol bureau reporter Laurel White explains how a local patchwork of stay-at-home rules took shape.
Short of a cure or effective treatment for COVID-19, something that could take years to develop, state and local health officials in Wisconsin are planning for a future where contact tracing plays a central role in combating the disease.
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On May 13 the state Supreme Court overturned Wisconsin's stay-at-home order. Some counties and municipalities across the state immediately began issuing their own orders or announcing the state's "Safer at Home" order would still apply in areas under their jurisdiction.
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The COVID-19 pandemic is adding hurdles for Wisconsin residents with disabilities to find caregivers, and both are weighing tough questions about how to keep each other safe during close interactions — if that's even possible at a time when protective equipment runs scarce.
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On April 7, over 400,000 people went out to the polls to vote in Wisconsin in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Multiple studies were conducted to see how in-person voting impacted Wisconsin's COVID-19 cases.
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The Wisconsin Elections Commission could vote to send absentee ballot request forms to all registered voters, bracing for a surge in mail-in voting for the November 2020 election.
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Wisconsin is preparing a testing and contact tracing-based response to the COVID-19 after a state Supreme Court ruling left details of opening businesses to counties.
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When Pete Schwaba, host of PBS Wisconsin's Director's Cut independent film showcase, started his quarantine at home in Marinette, he figured he'd have an abundance of time to watch movies, play games with his family and maybe learn a new hobby.
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Gov. Tony Evers has unveiled his plan for spending $1 billion in federal funds to combat COVID-19 in Wisconsin. The money will be used to pay for ongoing efforts to test people for the virus, identify those who may have been exposed and prepare for a potential surge.
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For 20 days in April, nurse Elizabeth Riley's day would begin by looking for coverings for her shoes. Then, she would put a shower cap on her hair and secure her one N95 mask that would need to last for the next five days.