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Fall and winter's plunging temperatures inspire spending more time indoors, but that warmth can also be an invitation to some unwelcome guests.
Reports of Japanese beetles chewing through the landscape are up in 2018, and their numbers are likely to be higher in Wisconsin than in previous years.
The peak of summer is a time when gardeners start turning their minds to preserving all the goodness they grow for the cold winter months that are all too soon ahead.
Gardeners around Wisconsin have thousands of choices when it comes to cultivating perennials, but success starts before they ever bring plants home from the nursery.
Heavy, wet snows can wreak havoc on many trees, particularly certain types of evergreens.
While potatoes are typically grown on commercial farms, backyards can just as easily produce their own spud harvests.
Growing vegetables from seeds started indoors can be fun and rewarding.
While it can be hard to pinpoint on the calendar, tree sap usually begins to flow when birds that have been away for the winter begin to return, daytime starts getting noticeably longer, and the extra sunshine prompts temperatures to surge above freezing.
Microgreens are simple and easy to grow indoors in winter.
Often sold during the holiday season in a decorated topiary form, the value of rosemary goes beyond its ornamental use.