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How can all of the state's tiny, elusive nocturnal flyers be counted? That's not possible. But the downward spiral of several bat species in Wisconsin can be tracked through the work of passionate conservation professionals, specialized technology and, crucially, legions of enthusiastic volunteers.
When Madison barber and business owner Brian Britt, 42, stepped up to a folding table in the entryway of the Urban League of Greater Madison, he had a single goal in his mind: Wipe from his record the decades-old criminal convictions he says are holding him back.
A handful of North American bat species that were once common in Wisconsin are possibly heading toward extinction, or at least disappearance from the state.
While the widely known opioid epidemic killed 3,800 people in Wisconsin between 2014 and 2018, a surge in meth use has quietly supplanted opioids in western and northern parts of the state.
The connection between Wisconsin's rivers and the wetlands that feed them has become increasingly tenuous. Its consequences for human communities come into clearer focus when heavy rains transform streams and rivers into forces of wanton destruction.
The vast majority of what happens under the surface of lakes goes unrecorded, meaning potentially important ecological stories are often lost to history.
The stage had been set for a public health scare prompted by vaping long before July 2019, when health officials in Wisconsin announced a cluster of severe lung illnesses in eight otherwise healthy teens in the state.
Confusion over what drives differences in gas prices between gas stations in the same town ⁠— or even at the same intersection ⁠— can be a constant source of frustration for drivers.
At least 23 Wisconsin counties assess "pay-to-stay" fees, which charge inmates for room and board for the time they are incarcerated. In addition, there are other fees inmates must pay, depending on the county they are in.
Wisconsin's self-proclaimed moniker as "America's Dairyland" is taking on fresh meaning in the 21st century thanks to a growing market for milk from an animal that bleats rather than moos.