Context
Context. Explaining the issues

Context

Slightly more than 23,000 ballots were thrown out from Wisconsin's April 2020 election, mostly because those voters or their witnesses missed at least one line on a form.
Police unions and the labor contracts they negotiate with local governments are seeing renewed scrutiny in communities across the United States.
Tracking data related to the pandemic can help clarify this torrent of information. Here are several visualizations that depict the impacts of COVID-19 across Wisconsin.
For people in Wisconsin who are interested in better understanding the pandemic, how it spreads and the ways they can protect themselves and their families, here are explanations for common questions and additional information about COVID-19 resources.
Conspiracy theories about contact tracing have percolated on social media since early May, after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published guidelines on how state health authorities should implement this "core disease control measure" to slow the spread of COVID-19.
Many police officers in Wisconsin commute to their job from homes in communities different from those in which they work. But how many officers live within and outside the municipal boundaries of the cities where they serve?
The killing of George Floyd, a Black resident of Minneapolis, reignited ongoing protests against police brutality — a movement fueled in part by a widening breach between law enforcement and the local communities they are charged with serving.
Deadly global pandemics are rare enough to motivate widespread attention when they emerge, but people around the world face the threat of seasonal influenza every year.
Significant numbers of Milwaukee voters were dissuaded from voting on April 7 by the sharp reduction in polling places and the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic — with the biggest effects seen among Black voters, according to a study from the Brennan Center for Justice.
In the early 1980s, a new mysterious malady captured the attention of public health professionals. Initially labeled GRID, these clusters of illnesses seemed to largely be an issue only on the East and West coasts. But Wisconsin's government was taking action.