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Every year, hundreds of thousands of cabins, cottages and lodges across the northern third of Wisconsin come back to life as their owners commence annual summertime excursions to their home away from home.
Is Wisconsin finding more cases of COVID-19 because more people are becoming infected with the virus that causes it, or because more people are being tested for it? Answers to this question are anything but simple.
"Spanish flu" ultimately killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide and 675,000 across the U.S., including 8,459 people in Wisconsin. History is resonating more than a century later as the state fights a new viral villain that has upended life across the world.
More than a month after Wisconsin directed residents to stay home as much as possible to slow the spread of COVID-19, adherence to the state's "safer at home" order is beginning to erode.
The spring 2020 elections in Wisconsin were certainly out of the ordinary, but even their dynamics reflected familiar partisan divisions in the electorate — and the courts.
The speed at which the novel coronavirus has raced around the world, and the severity of the disease it causes, has sparked interest in humanity's last experience with a contagion of such scale.
At the time, it seemed almost absurd. During an emergency meeting of the Sister Bay Village Board of Trustees on March 16, 2020, trustee Rob Zoschke leaned back in his chair and asked bluntly: "Should we be telling resorts to close down and not accept reservations and cancel existing ones?"
There are simply not enough resources available to test most people who are sick in Wisconsin and across the United States.The dilemma is spurring local and regional health systems to increasingly take testing matters into their own hands, a move state officials not only endorse but are actively pursuing.
Over the course of a single historic week, daily life in Wisconsin and across much of the United States ground to a halt as a dangerous new virus arrived in communities across the nation. A flurry of shutdowns raced to keep up with the spread of COVID-19 and the growing realization of its looming human impact.
As Wisconsin voters start going to the polls in the 2020 election cycle, most counties in the state maintain websites that do not employ at least one of two basic practices that would help bolster their digital security and public confidence in their online platforms.