Series: The Novel Coronavirus, COVID-19 And Wisconsin: April 2020


 
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Republican legislators and business groups made a coordinated push on April 30 for a plan that would reopen the state more quickly, with one restaurant owner telling lawmakers he's ordering alcohol and food in case he can start serving customers next week.
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Since Oshkosh artist Leif Larson can't spend much time at his easel in his studio, he's taken to painting the pace and perspectives of his home and family.
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Around $8 billion has been set aside for direct payments to tribes nationwide under the federal government's coronavirus relief package. However, some Wisconsin tribes are concerned about how that money is being distributed.
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Shortages of swabs and other testing supplies are still hampering efforts to increase Wisconsin's COVID-19 testing to 12,000 per day. The goal is part of Gov. Tony Evers' "Badger Bounce Back" plan for easing social distancing restrictions and reopening the state's economy.
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There are 6,854 positive cases of COVID-19 in Wisconsin, the state Department of Health Services announced on April 30. That's an increase of 334 cases from the day before.
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Surveys by WMEP and Marquette University show manufacturing industry across Wisconsin has been hit by COVID-19.
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The COVID-19 pandemic is changing the face of Wisconsin. Literally. More people are covering their face to slow the spread of COVID-19, something federal health officials have recommended.
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Before the Big Ten announced the cancelation of its 2020 men's basketball tournament, a group of doctors, researchers and public health experts from the conference's member institutions were already at work coordinating the its response to COVID-19.
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A plan from Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce calls for more businesses across the state to open with the caveat that they follow restrictions depending on how great the risk for COVID-19 is in their counties.