Scott Gordon

Series: The Flu And Wisconsin's Public Health

No two flu seasons are alike — from one year to the next, different types of the influenza virus dominate. Every year, virologists, health officials and healthcare providers marshall their resources to prevent and treat infections. When a flu season is particularly tough, as was the case in 2017-18, the illness tests limitations and vulnerabilities in the public health system. Wisconsin plays a crucial role in a nationwide network of influenza surveillance, which is also on guard for the emergence of a global flu pandemic. Meeting future challenges of influenza hinges on relationships that connect scientists and healthcare providers at local, state, federal and international levels.
 
A spike in flu cases comes as healthcare providers continue to deal with a shortage of one of their most common and crucial tools: pre-filled IV bags.
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During its weekly flu update conference call, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said this season's flu outbreak came early and shows few signs of abating.
The 2017-18 influenza season is well underway across the United States, and it's proving to be a rough one.
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Facing a severe influenza strain and an early peak, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services is urging Wisconsinites to get vaccinated early this year.
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As flu season begins and pharmacies start offering flu vaccinations, the perennial question of whether or not to get a shot arises.
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A national study looks at how well the flu vaccine prevents death in children ages 18 and younger.
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University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers are working to produce flu vaccines in a different way. They're experimenting with growing the flu virus in cells derived from canines and monkeys instead of eggs.
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It's been a low-activity year so far for influenza in Wisconsin and in much of the United States.
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The flu season is approaching, meaning opportunities to get a shot are arriving quickly. A pediatrics professor at the University of Wisconsin said there's a reason the push for the flu vaccine is during the fall.