Series: Gerrymandering, Wisconsin And The Courts

The arguments driving a potentially landmark court case over partisan gerrymandering in Wisconsin may already be outdated.
In the age of big data, it is possible to influence election results by drawing district boundaries without producing the bizarre-looking legislative districts which gave "gerrymandering" its name.
Wisconsin is embroiled in a legal battle that could radically reshape the state's political landscape. Literally.
Months of waiting and guessing are customary in cases heard by the U.S. Supreme Court, and that cycle is hitting home in Wisconsin.
Where Wisconsin's voters live and which political parties they support is at the heart of a major lawsuit before the U.S. Supreme Court.
Wisconsin is at the center of what is shaping up to be a landmark legal decision about how electoral districts are determined and the role of partisanship in creating legislative district boundaries.
As voters in many states learn more about the ongoing practice and effects of partisan gerrymandering, a high-profile lawsuit originating in Wisconsin may have profound implications for how much a political party can do to keep itself in power.
One of the most far-reaching consequences of the 2010 midterm elections was that strong partisan majorities in state legislatures — Republican like Wisconsin and Democratic like Illinois — controlled the redrawing of congressional and state-level electoral districts.