Health

Hundreds of children in Wisconsin's child welfare and juvenile justice systems who have complex behavioral health needs are being sent for care to facilities outside of the state — as far away as New Hampshire and New Mexico.
Children who suffer abuse or neglect or who live in dysfunctional homes often carry the burdens of these experiences into adulthood. Behavioral health professionals call these ordeals "adverse childhood experiences," or ACEs.
A sweeping shift over the past few decades in the practice of behavioral health has come to be known as trauma-informed care, an approach adopted by dozens of counties and tribes in Wisconsin.
Wisconsin launched an industrial hemp pilot program in 2018 and now has more than 2,100 applications for licenses in 2019.
La Crosse County Division of Health Services director Jason Witt discusses what he describes as a child welfare crisis in Wisconsin. Issues related to the abuse of opioids and methamphetamine are contributing to costs, and local governments agencies are seeking more funding.
Measles is back, and at a level not seen for a quarter-century, meaning a generation of healthcare workers have little experience with the disease.
With a national outbreak of measles causing concern in the medical community, UW-Madison pediatric infectious disease specialist Dr. James Conway discusses Wisconsin's vulnerability to a measles outbreak.
A study of drinking water quality in the southwestern region of the state is finding contamination beyond safe limits in two-fifths of private wells. Wisconsin Geological & Natural History Survey director Ken Bradbury discusses what its research is uncovering.
As of early 2019, 33 states have passed laws for legal medicinal use and 10 states have legalized recreational use. Suzie Kazar, a student journalist with the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, discusses how Wisconsin compares with the rest of the United States.
The same aspects of rural life that are attractive to many Wisconsinites — solitude, space, smaller communities — can often make getting the health care they need a challenge that ranges from mere inconvenience to life-threatening.