Health

Measles is back, and at a level not seen for a quarter-century, meaning a generation of healthcare workers have little experience with the disease.
With a national outbreak of measles causing concern in the medical community, UW-Madison pediatric infectious disease specialist Dr. James Conway discusses Wisconsin's vulnerability to a measles outbreak.
A study of drinking water quality in the southwestern region of the state is finding contamination beyond safe limits in two-fifths of private wells. Wisconsin Geological & Natural History Survey director Ken Bradbury discusses what its research is uncovering.
As of early 2019, 33 states have passed laws for legal medicinal use and 10 states have legalized recreational use. Suzie Kazar, a student journalist with the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, discusses how Wisconsin compares with the rest of the United States.
The same aspects of rural life that are attractive to many Wisconsinites — solitude, space, smaller communities — can often make getting the health care they need a challenge that ranges from mere inconvenience to life-threatening.
UW System schools are seeing growing mental health treatment needs, especially for students of color and underrepresented populations. Student mental health advocate Manasi Mohan discusses efforts to raise awareness about these needs.
While Wisconsin's laws on marijuana have stayed largely the same — and federal law continues to ban use and sales — bordering states have begun to move on the issue.
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State health officials say seasonal influenza has not peaked yet in Wisconsin and people can expect the illness to hang around through much of April.
Across the United States, increasing numbers of parents are refusing some or all vaccines on behalf of their children. This practice of vaccine refusal is commonplace enough that it is causing upward trends in preventable childhood infectious diseases.
The University of Wisconsin-Madison is at the center of controversial avian influenza research that involves making the virus potentially more dangerous for humans. Will Cushman of WisContext discusses what it would mean for this research to resume.