Articles by Rob Mentzer

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The governor's order that all nonessential businesses should close has created uncertainty about what exactly counts as an essential business. But with broad exemptions, a surprising number of businesses in Wisconsin are finding ways to stay open.
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Coronavirus has turned life upside down in Wisconsin. But the state still has an April 7 election coming up, with a presidential primary, state Supreme Court race and hundreds of local races. Their pandemic experiences could shape future politics.
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With schools shut down across the state, students are doing e-learning lessons at home. For some rural families who lack high-speed internet access, that's not so easy.
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Grocery shelves were depleted across the state as people stocked up in anticipation of a period of weeks when schools, public gatherings and many workplaces in Wisconsin were to be shut down.
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Not all public gatherings are being shut down in the wake of the governor's declaration of a public health emergency. In some places in Wisconsin, events and performances were continuing as scheduled.
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Universities are holding classes online. Sporting events and public gatherings are canceled. The question on parents' minds across Wisconsin: Can local public school closures be far behind?
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Election officials in Wisconsin are making contingency plans for what they'll do if polling places are closed due to concerns over the novel coronavirus.
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Organizers announced the postponement of the International Wisconsin Ginseng Festival, the first major event cancellation in Wisconsin as a result of concerns about the spread of COVID-19.
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Concerns about the spread of COVID-19 have led to a run on protective masks, and some health care facilities in Wisconsin are feeling the effects of the shortage.
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Climate change could rob Wisconsin of its maple syrup, a Northwoods forest ecologist says. According to projections by federal scientists, if carbon emissions aren't cut back, the state will become much less hospitable to the sugar maple, along with a host of other tree species.