History

Wisconsin's popular identity owes quite a bit to cows, their milk and culinary staples like cheese and ice cream.
Slavery was present in pre-statehood Wisconsin, and the institution writ large shaped attitudes that would impede efforts by African Americans in the state to secure their right to vote.
How often do flags fly at half-staff in Wisconsin? More than they used to.
From the the rights of runaway slaves in to the modern debate over school vouchers, Wisconsin has played a significant role in shaping American law.
As the U.S. dairy industry continues to struggle in the face of ongoing low prices, federal policies intended to support farmers are attracting more attention.
At a glance, Wisconsin's legislative district maps in place since 2011 do not reveal districts with the bizarre shapes and outlines that are classic markers of gerrymandering schemes. But a closer examination of the state Assembly districts reveals a more sophisticated approach to this electoral stratagem.
While Wisconsin is known as "America's Dairyland," this nickname would not have accurately depicted the state during its first 50 years.
Prior to 2011, Milwaukee-area residents Marla Stephens and Kris Lennon felt that their votes counted. Now, however, they say the impact of their votes is diminished due to Wisconsin's 2011 redistricting — which is under challenge in a U.S. Supreme Court case.
As state trails snake around Wisconsin, they wind through cities, towns and farm fields, along lake shores and river banks, connecting communities to each other and providing a pathway to and from adjoining states.
Over the course of just a few decades at the end of the 19th century, millions upon millions of birds were killed in a spree of hunting for food and feathers.