Series: Refugee Resettlement In Wisconsin

Fleeing conflict and persecution around the world, refugees are a small but significant part of Wisconsin's population. While it's not the biggest destination for resettlement in the United States, the state is home to thousands of people who arrived as refugees from several dozen countries. A Hmong community took root across Wisconsin in the 1970s, and a small Somali community settled in rural Barron County in the 1990s, but large numbers of refugees from countries including Burma, Iraq and the Democratic Republic of the Congo have arrived in the 21st century. People seeking refugee status in the U.S. — which is distinct from other kinds of immigration — have gone through an extensive vetting process, but a rise of xenophobia and new federal policies threaten to make their position more uncertain.
 
The bombs started getting closer in 2012 as Syria's civil war was just beginning.
Hmong refugees fleeing war in Vietnam and Laos began arriving in the United States in 1976 — many of them after fighting alongside Americans in the Vietnam War, or losing loved ones in that conflict Over the ensuing four decades, Wisconsin has become home to the nation's third-largest Hmong population following California and Minnesota.
Miss Elizabeth came to Milwaukee from Liberia in 2007. She knew no English. She'd never really even gone to school.
Mousa Aldashash and his family came to Middleton after escaping violence in Syria.
Lutheran Social Services is preparing for the possibility of refugees from Syria resettling in Wisconsin.
Stacy Taeuber started the Immigrant Justice Clinic at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2012. The clinic has served over 100 individuals from at least 20 nations in deportation proceedings since its inception.