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Charting the animal origins of human diseases like COVID-19 can be difficult and often leads to unexpected discoveries.
In Wisconsin, the First World War and 1918 flu pandemic came together in a typical yet tragic way.
There are simply not enough resources available to test most people who are sick in Wisconsin and across the United States.The dilemma is spurring local and regional health systems to increasingly take testing matters into their own hands, a move state officials not only endorse but are actively pursuing.
When a new and dangerous respiratory disease started racing around the globe in early 2020, it had been just over a century since humankind endured the 1918 influenza pandemic.
Over the course of a single historic week, daily life in Wisconsin and across much of the United States ground to a halt as a dangerous new virus arrived in communities across the nation. A flurry of shutdowns raced to keep up with the spread of COVID-19 and the growing realization of its looming human impact.
No matter how methods have changed over the ages, a lot of time and energy go into transforming the springtime sap flows of maple trees into sweet, sugary syrup.
A serious new respiratory illness is gaining steam around the world, and epidemiologists, virologists and many other scientists are sprinting to learn as much about it as quickly as possible.
Beloit stands out in Wisconsin. It's a small city — home to fewer than 40,000 people — with a relatively large African American community.
Public health authorities and medical professionals in Wisconsin are preparing for potential cases of a respiratory virus that's new to humans, having emerged in China and subsequently spreading around the world.
Search and rescue volunteers tend to be dedicated to their craft. Some spend thousands of dollars and countless hours training for and carrying out searches.