Articles by Will Cushman

Over the first three months after the coronavirus pandemic struck Wisconsin in March, only two days passed during which no Wisconsinites were announced to have died from the new disease wreaking havoc around the globe in 2020.
More than two dozen Wisconsin communities have witnessed demonstrations demanding greater accountability for police over the week since Minneapolis police officers killed George Floyd on May 25.
Short of a cure or effective treatment for COVID-19, something that could take years to develop, state and local health officials in Wisconsin are planning for a future where contact tracing plays a central role in combating the disease.
Is Wisconsin finding more cases of COVID-19 because more people are becoming infected with the virus that causes it, or because more people are being tested for it? Answers to this question are anything but simple.
More than a month after Wisconsin directed residents to stay home as much as possible to slow the spread of COVID-19, adherence to the state's "safer at home" order is beginning to erode.
Wisconsinites are adapting to life under the cloud of COVID-19, and for a growing group that means getting into the habit of covering up with a face mask when they venture from their homes.
Shared via
PBS Wisconsin
Research currently underway at the University of Wisconsin-Madison could lead to a unique vaccine that provides protection against both the novel coronavirus and influenza, with human trials potentially on the horizon as early as fall 2020.
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There are simply not enough resources available to test most people who are sick in Wisconsin and across the United States.The dilemma is spurring local and regional health systems to increasingly take testing matters into their own hands, a move state officials not only endorse but are actively pursuing.
Over the course of a single historic week, daily life in Wisconsin and across much of the United States ground to a halt as a dangerous new virus arrived in communities across the nation. A flurry of shutdowns raced to keep up with the spread of COVID-19 and the growing realization of its looming human impact.