Articles by Will Cushman

Wisconsin's affinity for alcohol — and the drug's complicated cultural impact on the state — can in many ways be explained by a few straightforward biochemical processes.
How are buzzed, drunk and high drivers held accountable for their actions in Wisconsin?
Hundreds of children in Wisconsin's child welfare and juvenile justice systems who have complex behavioral health needs are being sent for care to facilities outside of the state — as far away as New Hampshire and New Mexico.
Children who suffer abuse or neglect or who live in dysfunctional homes often carry the burdens of these experiences into adulthood. Behavioral health professionals call these ordeals "adverse childhood experiences," or ACEs.
A sweeping shift over the past few decades in the practice of behavioral health has come to be known as trauma-informed care, an approach adopted by dozens of counties and tribes in Wisconsin.
Measles is back, and at a level not seen for a quarter-century, meaning a generation of healthcare workers have little experience with the disease.
The United States Department of Agriculture census documents a large and diverse farming economy in Wisconsin, but also one in flux.
Whether a meadow of flowering bulbs or a mix of grasses and herbaceous perennials, more varied green spaces provide aesthetic value and habitat for diverse animal communities.
The same aspects of rural life that are attractive to many Wisconsinites — solitude, space, smaller communities — can often make getting the health care they need a challenge that ranges from mere inconvenience to life-threatening.
A maelstrom of economic and demographic forces are hammering Wisconsin's dairy farmers. But what's causing such exceptional distress in one of the state's iconic industries?