StopBullying.gov/U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Series: Bullying and Cyberbullying

Bullying not only harms children, but likewise poses a challenge to parents, caretakers, educators and community leaders. Rates of bullying reported by surveyed students varies, but it's a persistent problem with ongoing consequences for mental health -- both bullying victims and their aggressors face an increased risk of suicide. In the 21st century, children are also facing the issue of cyberbullying through social networks and other digital communications. Trusted adults play an integral role in prevention and intervention, by teaching kids how to get along better with others and resolve disagreements respectfully, by modeling appropriate behaviors, and by advocating on behalf of vulnerable individuals.
 
As little as 15 minutes of discussion per day can establish lines of communication that help kids seek advice when confronted with bullying.
Connections are the key to stopping bullying: Teens are less likely to bully others in person or online if they have adults in their lives whom they don't want to disappoint.
A teen who experiences headaches or stomach aches, has unexplained bruises or injuries or avoids school may be the victim of bullying and needs a parent or caretaker to intervene.
Parents today are much more sensitive to the signs and effects of bullying on their children. However, they may not be as conscious of how their own behavior can affect bullying by children.
A leading researcher on cyberbullying at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire said Trump's style on Twitter offers teachable moments.