Articles by Danielle Kaeding

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A record amount of cargo containing components used for generating wind power moved through the Twin Ports during the 2019 shipping season. The surge in wind traffic comes as Duluth-Superior handled the lowest amount of coal in more than three decades.
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As Enbridge explores new possible routes for Line 5, the pipeline has created division among neighbors and communities over the path it may take. And, federal and state regulators have no authority to weigh in on the siting of the proposed line.
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The number of people who were homeless on a single night in 2019 declined in Wisconsin while the nation saw an overall increase, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Annual Homeless Assessment Report.
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Wisconsin in 2018 saw its most sewer overflow events since 2010, with increasing volumes of discharged waste. Experts say the problem plagues communities across the Great Lakes. Driving the spike: intensifying rainfall due to climate change.
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Since 2008, there have been 14 dams that have failed statewide, said Tanya Lourigan, state dam safety engineer with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
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As communities are under threat from more frequent, intense storms, a report by the nonprofit Pew Charitable Trusts found Wisconsin is among 13 cities and states that have been able to reduce their vulnerability to flooding.
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Members of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa made a trek to Pacwawong Lake in northern Wisconsin to pass on the tradition of harvest wild rice, or manoomin, to tribal youth.
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When she was 19 years old, Katherine Denomie's mother first taught her how to make frybread.
Law enforcement in Superior and Douglas County seized the most heroin they've ever seen in 2016.
Bayfield County is looking for more leeway from the state to protect water quality from potential farm runoff, but state officials say their hands are tied to the letter of the law.