Series: Drinking Water Quality

When longtime city of Milwaukee Health Commissioner Bevan Baker resigned on Jan. 12, it brought renewed attention to the city's broader struggle to address the problem of lead poisoning.
Wisconsin is proud of its water, including the stuff that comes out of the tap. Every year, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources releases an annual report about how the state's public water systems are doing.
Local governments across Wisconsin face an open question of how they'll pay for ongoing lead pipe replacement efforts.
Wisconsin's municipal drinking-water systems have tens of thousands of lead pipes in communities around the state, and there is growing pressure to get rid of them.
Up to 60 percent of sampled wells in a Kewaunee County study contained fecal microbes, many of which are capable of making people and calves sick, two scientists told hundreds of local residents gathered at a public meeting on June 7.
Lead presents a continuing health threat in communities across the U.S., and has lingered in homes and drinking water in Wisconsin.
A Florida State University professor looked to Wisconsin to investigate how climate change might make people more vulnerable to groundwater-borne pathogens in the decades ahead.
More than 180 water fountains in the Milwaukee Public Schools district contained lead levels above EPA standards. There were 12,000 samples done of more than 3,000 water fountains and other water sources in the district's 191 buildings.
Green Bay is the first Wisconsin city to get a half-million-dollar grant to help residents replace antiquated lead pipes.
As the state calls for ideas that use manure digesters to help improve drinking-water quality in Wisconsin, it's helpful to better understand how the actual functions of digesters align with the problem at hand.