Fieldwork
Fieldwork. From the experts

Fieldwork

Kids developed ideas about race by observing and interpreting what was going on around them. And because of important variations in these social environments, the children made sense of race in different ways.
Red foxes and coyotes are a curious bunch of carnivores. Scientists studying these carnivores living in the state's capital are beginning to unravel how these city dwellers differ from their country counterparts, sometimes in surprising ways.
Confusion over what drives differences in gas prices between gas stations in the same town ⁠— or even at the same intersection ⁠— can be a constant source of frustration for drivers.
Students entering their senior year of high school in the fall of 2019 appear to be among the largest classes in Wisconsin for the foreseeable future.
New business startups led by entrepreneurs are vital to a vibrant and strong economy, and, in entrepreneurship, Wisconsin tends to lag other states.
Technological changes — electricity and mechanization — in the mid-20th century would revolutionize the practice and business of agriculture in Wisconsin, and set into motion economic and demographic changes that continue well into the 21st century.
Farmers grow a whole lot of crops in Wisconsin, but the state's wild places, not to mention its sidewalk cracks, are also home to edible and handy plants for anybody enterprising enough to find and gather them.
One of the first environmental scientists in northwest Wisconsin to raise concerns about how prepared the region was for more intense flooding is Randy Lehr.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
What are the challenges several northwest Wisconsin counties face from extreme precipitation? WisContext associate editor Will Cushman and former Northland College professor Randy Lehr discuss the growing costs flooding poses to public infrastructure.
Shared via
WPT
Wisconsin politicians have sparred over how to provide mental health resources to the state's farmers. UW-Extension agriculture and health safety specialist John Shutske discusses the groundwork necessary to help farmers struggling with mental health issues.