Fieldwork
Fieldwork. From the experts

Fieldwork

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Wisconsin politicians have sparred over how to provide mental health resources to the state's farmers. UW-Extension agriculture and health safety specialist John Shutske discusses the groundwork necessary to help farmers struggling with mental health issues.
Wisconsin's population structure is dominated by the magnitude of the baby-boom generation, and their presence is strongest in rural areas.
Comparing population pyramids over time can explain a lot about what life is like in a place, as well as its economic and social challenges.
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The Wisconsin Legislature is the most polarized by party in recent decades. UW-Green Bay political scientist Aaron Weinschenk discusses how legislators' roll call votes help shape the metric of polarization.
Researchers in Wisconsin are exploring how polarized politics can fracture civic discourse. UW-Madison journalism professor Mike Wagner discusses the work of the Center for Communication and Civic Renewal to investigate the intersection of media, technology and politics.
For many school children, the summer months mean a lack of adequate food, including a well-balanced school lunch on a daily basis.
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As Wisconsin sweats in the midst of a July heatwave, a report shows that global warming could lead to a jump in dangerous high summer temperatures in the state. UW Nelson Institute for Climatic Research researcher Michael Notaro discusses the study and what it means.
Talk of political polarization — epitomized by the growing divide between Republicans and Democrats — is ubiquitous these days.
Its gaze stretches far beyond Earth's confines, and it's taken part in astronomy research around the planet, but when the sun sets, the Burnham telescope calls Wisconsin home.
Tracking global croplands and how they are changing is a massive, pressing and complex undertaking made possible by advances in remote sensing and computing.