Fieldwork
Fieldwork. From the experts

Fieldwork

With the advance of the brown marmorated stink bug across the United States, Wisconsin researchers are working to detect when and where their populations will reach nuisance or agricultural pest levels in the state — leading to the first official report of them on on agricultural crops in Wisconsin in early October.
From loon-watchers to fighters of invasive species, Wisconsin is home to many groups engaged in citizen science. One example of a citizen science effort of this type in the state is the Wisconsin Bat Monitoring Project.
The fresh taste of citrus fruits and their fragrant flowers are appealing and may make a trip to a Florida orchard sound tempting. But growing citrus plants indoors can, if lucky, result in some delicious fruits and provide homegrown tropical flavors in winter.
Conditions must be just right for blueberry plants to survive and produce fruit. And although Wisconsin's climate is perfect, the soil – especially in the southern part of the state – isn't what blueberries like,
Microgreens are simple and easy to grow indoors in winter.
Cattle can often be seen grazing in meadows around Wisconsin, but they may also be finding their meals in wooded areas.
In recent decades, ranchers and federal agencies have spent a lot of time figuring out how to expand and improve the use of dogs to guard livestock.
When temperatures warm in late winter and early spring, it's a good time to take advantage of these conditions to plan tree pruning.
Few people would consider Wisconsin an ethnically diverse state, unless they're considering various strains of European ancestry. That is factually correct, but Wisconsin has seen many waves of change over the years.
Although Wisconsin technically has non-partisan elections, partisanship has been on full display in recent state Supreme Court races.