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Series: Heat Stress

Wisconsin experiences all four seasons in their full intensity, sometimes even within a few days of each other. This pattern reflects a classic example of a continental climate, a classification applied to regions of the globe with hot or warm summers and cold winters with average temperatures often below freezing. More specifically, Wisconsin has a humid continental climate, and straddles the border between its hot and mild summer subtypes. What this means over the summer season is that many areas of the state can have temperatures high enough to be dangerous — to humans, to animals and even to plants. When the mercury rises, though, people can take action to protect lives and property.
 
Healthy landscape plants need care and maintenance, especially when summer rainfall is inadequate.
Hot weather and a high heat index are a challenge for farmers each summer. During heat waves, farmers need to take precautions for their animals to minimize the risk of injury and sickness from prolonged exposure to high temperatures and humidity.
Heat exposure kills more people each year than floods, tornadoes, lightning and hurricanes combined. Heat-related illness can develop quickly and progress to deadly stages.