Images via U.S. Department of Agriculture

Series: Climate Science And Wisconsin

Climate science is complex. Because changes to the global climate span continents and develop over decades, their effects on individual places and weather events are difficult to pinpoint. But with an ever growing body of historical climate data and sophisticated computer modeling, scientists can forecast how climate change is unfolding — and likely continue to play out — in places like Wisconsin with increasing confidence. In coming decades communities around the state are projected to continue experiencing warmer and more extreme weather. These effects are increasingly being recognized, with winter and nighttime temperatures rising, and heavier rainstorms occurring with increasing regularity. From the environment to human health to the economy, gauging the impacts of a changing climate is an urgent scientific endeavor with implications for every Wisconsinite.
 
In the longer term, warmer waters that come with a warming climate may make it more expensive to combat sea lampreys, longtime predators of Great Lakes fish.
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As farmers struggle to raise their crops and communities find themselves under water, the effects of climate change are being increasingly felt in Wisconsin. UW Law School director of research centers Sumudu Atapattu discusses how this issue intersects with concepts of human rights.
One of the first environmental scientists in northwest Wisconsin to raise concerns about how prepared the region was for more intense flooding is Randy Lehr.
Complaints about living in the Midwest often hinge on its seasonal extremes as a top reason to steer clear of the region, and a July 2019 study highlights the health risks posed by dangerously high summer heat in Wisconsin and throughout the United States.
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As Wisconsin sweats in the midst of a July heatwave, a report shows that global warming could lead to a jump in dangerous high summer temperatures in the state. UW Nelson Institute for Climatic Research researcher Michael Notaro discusses the study and what it means.
Tracking global croplands and how they are changing is a massive, pressing and complex undertaking made possible by advances in remote sensing and computing.
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Research by the UW-Madison Center for Limnology collecting 30 years of data points to long-term impacts of climate change on mercury levels in lakes and fish in Wisconsin. WPR reporter Sarah Whites-Kodischek describes how scientists came across these findings.
As recently as 2013, water levels on most of the Great Lakes were very low. But since 2014 the issue has been too much water, not too little.
In a world with a changing climate, just how accurate are hardiness zone maps, and how do their makers continue to ensure these tools are as useful as possible?
Canada is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world, according to a 2019 climate change study. What does that mean to the Great Lakes?