Policy

Audio: 
Shared via
Wisconsin Life
The only time Holmen High School junior Gracie Kromke is exposed to the stereotypical bad lunch — rubber-roni, slapping food on plates — is when she hears stories about them.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
The number of people who were homeless on a single night in 2019 declined in Wisconsin while the nation saw an overall increase, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Annual Homeless Assessment Report.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
More people are being locked up in Wisconsin, and the increase in inmates in county jails and state prisons is costing taxpayers and straining capacity of corrections facilities in some places.
Shared via
PBS Wisconsin
The population of people of color in Green Bay is projected to double or triple by 2040. Mohammed Bey, director of diversity and inclusion at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, discusses what diversity and equity efforts looks like in the greater Green Bay area.
A group of chemicals known as PFAS are prompting increasing attention and concern across Wisconsin. What are these chemicals and why are they such a big deal?
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
Milwaukee's crime rate is steadily decreasing, according to city officials. Over the last five years, the city has seen a 33% reduction in violent crime including homicides, nonfatal shootings and carjackings.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
Wisconsin in 2018 saw its most sewer overflow events since 2010, with increasing volumes of discharged waste. Experts say the problem plagues communities across the Great Lakes. Driving the spike: intensifying rainfall due to climate change.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
There were big changes in federal immigration policy in 2019, including the number of refugees allowed to resettle in the U.S. WisContext associate editor Will Cushman discusses how those changes affected refugee resettlement in Wisconsin.
Following two years of steep drops, the number of international refugees who resettled in Wisconsin leveled off in 2019.
Shared via
PBS Wisconsin
Every year in Wisconsin, dozens of people get lost in the woods or need rescuing on the water. The people who are called out to look for them are trained like professionals, but get paid like volunteers.