Science

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Cell service on the Red Cliff tribe's reservation has improved significantly after a 300-foot cell tower became fully operational. The tribe is the first in the country to construct a tower as part of a nationwide public safety broadband network for emergency services.
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Climate change could rob Wisconsin of its maple syrup, a Northwoods forest ecologist says. According to projections by federal scientists, if carbon emissions aren't cut back, the state will become much less hospitable to the sugar maple, along with a host of other tree species.
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A case of the novel coronavirus in Wisconsin was confirmed by the state Department of Health Services on Feb. 5. WisContext associate editor Will Cushman discusses why medical face masks are a visible part of this outbreak and what public health officials say about using them.
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Wisconsin will provide a record amount of money for broadband internet in underserved areas of the state that need it for business, government and school. But it is not enough to meet demand.
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Flies were used during early research into human genetics, said Dr. Doug Brusich. An assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Brusich is among a group of researchers who now use the insect to study traumatic brain injuries.
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People in Wisconsin are going to the library for different reasons, and libraries are serving them in different ways, thanks to the technological changes of the last two decades.
The novel coronavirus sweeping through China and rippling across the globe is invisible to the naked eye, but one of its effects is increasingly conspicuous on sidewalks, public transit and doctors' offices around the world: the widespread use of face masks.
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What's considered normal weather changes over time. To account for that, the National Weather Service will recalculate a 30-year average of weather patterns from 1991 to 2020.
Public health authorities and medical professionals in Wisconsin are preparing for potential cases of a respiratory virus that's new to humans, having emerged in China and subsequently spreading around the world.
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The novel coronavirus originated in Wuhan, China, but as anxieties rise around the world, communities are working to prevent its spread. Wisconsin state epidemiologist Ryan Westergaard details the status of preparations for a potential outbreak in Wisconsin.