Steve Shupe (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Series: Wisconsin's 21st-Century Workforce

Manufacturing and agriculture have historically reigned supreme in Wisconsin's economy. But automation and consolidation in those sectors, and a shifting emphasis toward service- and technology-based industries, means the nature of work is changing rapidly. As workers across the state seek to start their careers, pursue better jobs, or find themselves struggling to reap the benefits of economic growth, they're looking for new opportunities wherever they might find them, including outside Wisconsin. As demographic and workforce shifts shape the state's future, political and business leaders are looking to attract and retain workers with advanced skills and education. These efforts are related to larger forces affecting Wisconsin's future, including population decline in rural areas, the role of higher education, and how public resources are used to develop the economy.
 
Wisconsin has made headlines in recent years as a state where entrepreneurship struggles and startup activity lags behind the United States as a whole.
Wisconsin is aging, and as its population of senior citizens grows, the health care workers who attend to them face growing risks of overwork and burnout.
As Wisconsin's unemployment rate stays at record lows, nursing home facilities are struggling to find people to care for its elderly residents.
Economic trends in Wisconsin have recovered considerably a decade since the Great Recession. UW-Madison economics professor Noah Williams discusses what effects are on the workforce, particularly between rural and urban areas.
Wisconsin is running an advertising campaign is to attract new workers from Chicago to move to Wisconsin. Scott Gordon of WisContext discusses how cost-of-living calculations are determined and in what ways they vary between different places.
Cost of living isn't a standardized, hard-and-fast mathematical concept. Looking into how it's defined and applied to specific places reveals less about empirical economic differences and more about the nuanced and fluid ways in which people make decisions about money and opportunity and lifestyle.
Past the shuttered General Motors plant and the Janesville Terrace trailer home park, a facility not seen in the United States in three decades could soon rise: a manufacturing plant that will make a vital radioactive isotope used to detect cancer.
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The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation went live with its million dollar ad campaign in Chicago, with a marketing blitz targeted young adults on public transit and social media.
Gov. Scott Walker and state economic development officials want to spend about $7 million on a marketing campaign to entice young, college-educated workers to move to Wisconsin.
Wisconsin is making a full-court press with an ad campaign to try and attract a younger workforce into the state. Chris Reader of Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce breaks down the effort to bring in younger employees to the state.