Series: Wisconsin's 21st-Century Workforce

Manufacturing and agriculture have historically reigned supreme in Wisconsin's economy. But automation and consolidation in those sectors, and a shifting emphasis toward service- and technology-based industries, means the nature of work is changing rapidly. As workers across the state seek to start their careers, pursue better jobs, or find themselves struggling to reap the benefits of economic growth, they're looking for new opportunities wherever they might find them, including outside Wisconsin. As demographic and workforce shifts shape the state's future, political and business leaders are looking to attract and retain workers with advanced skills and education. These efforts are related to larger forces affecting Wisconsin's future, including population decline in rural areas, the role of higher education, and how public resources are used to develop the economy.
 
Wisconsin is expected to be short at least 700 primary care providers by the year 2035. Wisconsin Council on Medical Education and Workforce executive director George Quinn discussed how the state is working to bridge the impending shortfall of physicians.
The state of Wisconsin's efforts to attract and retain a younger workforce are coinciding with a growing public reckoning in Madison and surrounding Dane County with the fact that many of its minority residents don't necessarily experience the city as welcoming or inclusive
As Wisconsin's unemployment rate stays at record lows, nursing home facilities are struggling to find people to care for its elderly residents.
Wisconsin is running an advertising campaign is to attract new workers from Chicago to move to Wisconsin. Scott Gordon of WisContext discusses how cost-of-living calculations are determined and in what ways they vary between different places.
Cost of living isn't a standardized, hard-and-fast mathematical concept. Looking into how it's defined and applied to specific places reveals less about empirical economic differences and more about the nuanced and fluid ways in which people make decisions about money and opportunity and lifestyle.
Gov. Scott Walker and state economic development officials want to spend about $7 million on a marketing campaign to entice young, college-educated workers to move to Wisconsin.
Wisconsin did not add many new private sector jobs in 2016. According to federal labor data, the state ranked 33rd in the nation. Wisconsin Public Radio capitol bureau chief Shawn Johnson discusses the state's job trends.
Wisconsin's private sector job growth ranked 33rd in the country in 2016, according to detailed numbers released Wednesday by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. The data provides the most thorough picture yet of job creation since Gov. Scott Walker took office in 2011.
Low hourly wages, the lack of professional development opportunities and a high turnover rate are major factors contributing to the state's preschool teacher shortage, experts say.
Opportunities exist to improve Wisconsin's education pipeline and create a future with competitive wages, innovative industry and entrepreneurial activity.